Wine #4

Onto the second wine of the night from Corkbuzz... (see previous post...)


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My guess(es):

Sauvignon Blanc. Or maybe Chenin Blanc?

Oof. This was a tricky one... What led me to my conclusion(s)?

I was getting some grassy notes, and citrus & tropical notes. High Acidity. But it was higher body than expected for Sauv Blanc, so that is why I started to feel like it was a Chenin Blanc, also known for its high acidity...


CORRECT ANSWER


CHABLIS!

 

Remember the last post? This is Chardonnay from Northern France. Corkbuzz does a great job of explaining more about how it is typically described

A one-of-a-kind wine region known for three specific things: a chilly climate, chalky limestone-and-clay soil, and 100% Chardonnay. This unique combination of factors makes for white wines with streaking acidity and intense minerality. You’ll find briny notes of crushed stones, shells and sea-spray as well as tart citrus fruit. True to form, the area was an ancient seabed, and the soil is stuffed with fossilized evidence.


The specific wine I tried:

2010 VAL DE MER CHABLIS

From cellar tracker someone said:

Light lemon yellow color; tart lemon, citrus nose; tasty, tart apple, lemon, mineral palate with medium acidity; medium-plus finish


In sum, I was pretty wrong. I thought it was a new word wine, because it was a bit fruitier than I would have expected from such a cold climate (the more fruit, typically the hotter the weather).

Actually, that is why VINTAGE (the year on the bottle) is important....

As the weather can differ from year to year, the flavor of the wine can differ dramatically! Hotter years mean the grapes got more ripe, which could mean the wine will taste fruitier and it will likely be higher in alcohol... Since the wine was so fruitty, maybe this was a hotter year than normal in Chablis?

Or, maybe I should just stop making excuses and declare defeat.

Wine Tasting Fail.

Looks like my "phase1" of flavor detection was just off. This is where one area where psychology has the potential to affect the tasting. If you "think" it is something, you will falsely detect things not in the wine.

Being human, I'll never completely be able to override biases, but I'll do my best to pay attention to ONLY what is in the glass.

Next time, I'll pay attention to that "steely, briny, wet-wool" flavors that the Corkbuzz Bartender told me to look out for...